trouble with Salt

As Rob and Katy note, the UK’s Salt Publishing is having financial woes. Salt director Chris Hamilton-Emery suggests buying just one book to help tip the balance in its favor. Since I already have Rob’s Opposite of Cabbage, I just bought Katy’s Me and the Dead. That’s kind of cheating, since I’ve been meaning to treat myself to it forever, but hey, win-wins are good. Fingers crossed for Salt.

katyevansbush

robmackenzie

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6 thoughts on “trouble with Salt

  1. Hmm, it’s like the government bailing out failing businesses. Do it once, do it twice, start to wonder if it is a business or a charity. Maybe they should think about fundamental changes to the way they run the business. Hmm, it’s like the government bailing out failing businesses. Do it once, do it twice, start to wonder if it is a business or a charity. Maybe they should think about fundamental changes to the way they run the business. The world is changing, particularly the world of literature and publishing. I would want to see some sign that SALT acknowledges that before I started to invest in failing business.

  2. Blood Axe Books sold over 150,000 copies of their last poetry anthology. They only publish poetry and they are a hugely successful business. But then they publish the type of poetry that people want to read. SALT has been at the forefront of the upper middle class intellectuals hijacking of poetry, consistently promoting a kind of pretentious obscurantism that has largely alienated the entire audience for poetry. You reap what you sow.

  3. Bloodaxe has a huge Arts Council subsidy which is renewed annualy (I believe it’s in the region of £100,000 per year!). That’s not an attack on Bloodaxe, a poetry press I admire, but it shows the reality.

    Paul, Salt began by publishing only ‘innovative’ poetry. There is an audience for that, but when Salt expanded over the last three years, it started to publish poetry collections from all across the spectrum – from late modernist to mainstream. My own book is neither one nor the other, and it’s certainly not “pretentious obscurantism”. I hope you can take a look at the Salt website. You’ll find that things aren’t the way you describe them at all.

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