recently frabjous stuff

the novices practice forgiveness – new poem at Valparaiso Poetry Review in amazing company

‘Ten Fabulous Videopoems’ – my ‘top ten’ video list for the series at Moving Poems Magazine

12 Moons series – collaboration with Erica Goss, Marc Neys and Kathy McTavish. Erica the poems, me the voice, Marc the video and Kathy the soundtracks. This unfolded over several months last year and is now complete. So much pleasure.

And a new video remix from a Storehouse poem by James Brush:


 
All mimsy were the borogove and the mome raths outgrabe.

Wow, Poetry Storehouse!

I am blown away by what Poetry Storehouse contributors have pulled together during the three weeks or so since our last ‘new additions’ update. In addition to featuring poems from six new poets in this update, the Storehouse has collected 23 new video remixes, two new still image remixes, and 27 new audio recordings by seven volunteer readers in that time. And that doesn’t count the waves made by Storehouse remixes elsewhere on the web. Read the details in today’s ‘new additions’ update. There was so much material for this update, that for the first time the update post needed a user-friendly clickable table of contents up top.

I made a quick analysis of the diverse group of artists responsible for all this amazing collaborative work – that is, those specifically named in this update for having contributed in some capacity. There are 40 names in total – 23 poets, 11 video remixers and 6 volunteer readers. And some of those contribute to the Storehouse in double roles or more, as indicated below. How’s that for an amazing artistic community?

I am truly humbled and amazed at all the creative energy that is constantly changing hands and forms at the Poetry Storehouse and offer warmest thanks to our contributors, viewers and listeners for making it all possible.

Names in today’s update:

POETS
Maureen Tolman Flannery
Jim Murdoch
Gail Goepfert
Anton Yakovlev
Tom Roby
Alexis Rhone Fancher
Sally Bliumis-Dunn
James Reiss
Claudia Serea
Derek JG Williams
Janice Soderling
Eric Burke
David Coldwell
Anne Higgins
Kristine Ong Muslim
Amy MacLennan
Jessie Carty
Ivy Alvarez
Uma Gowrishankar
Kathleen Kirk
Janeen Rastall
Cynthia Atkins
Cheryl Snelling
Mary Lou Buschi

VIDEO REMIXERS
Lori Ersolmaz
Marie Craven (also featured reader)
Othniel Smith
Marc Neys
Jutta Pryor
Nigel Wells
Charles Musser (also previously featured poet)
Dustin Luke Nelson (also featured poet)
Bill Yarrow (also featured reader & previously featured poet)
Nic Sebastian (also featured poet & reader)

READERS
Amy Miller
Peg Duthie (also previously featured poet)
Ron Runeborg
Jenene Ravesloot (also previously featured poet)
James Brush (also previously featured poet)
DM (middle-schooler)

LINKS
Storehouse poets
Storehouse remixers
Storehouse readers
Video & still image remixes based on Poetry Storehouse poems
Storehouse poems selected for showcasing by ‘Moving Poems’
Interviews with Poetry Storehouse poets & remixers
New Additions archive

flavors of frabjous

I spend so much time working with other people’s poems that I’m always in a state of low-grade guilt over my own poems, which will very occasionally erupt in a spasm of submitting. Some happy results to report – there are Nic poems forthcoming in Blue Fifth Review, Valparaiso Poetry Review and Frostwriting</a>, and a chapbook manuscript of mine has made the first cut at the fabulous Hyacinth Girl Press. Woot!

Read ‘Helen in Egypt’ aloud, all the way through – check

In April 2013, I decided to try and read H.D.’s Helen in Egypt aloud, all the way through, and started uploading readings over at Voice Project: ‘Helen In Egypt’. Today, just shy of a year later, I uploaded the last reading and accomplished my objective. I read it in segments, over many months, and while I tried to keep recording conditions and delivery consistent throughout, there are inevitable variations in both at various points, which I hope any listeners the project may attract will forgive. The book may be listened to or downloaded in individual segments – by its three large sections, by individual books in those sections, or by individual parts in those books.

I was inspired to undertake the reading by this post at the Poetry Foundation, in which the author talks about how voicing, recording, and listening to poems he really wanted to get to know took the experience of ‘knowing’ a poem to a whole new level for him. Which sounds exactly right, and there is no question that I have had an entirely different engagement with and experience of Helen in Egypt through reading it aloud in so deliberate a fashion.

My warm thanks to the folks at New Directions Publishing Corporation, agents for the Schaffner Family Foundation, for blessing the project.

multi-format poetry publishing, cont’d

Check out this awesome web-page. This is how poetry should be published!

We blogged about Dave Bonta’s Twelve Simple Songs before, but there’s more now. From a single online location (Dave built a dedicated page for the publication), you can read the poems via Issuu on the web, download a PDF of the poems, download an MP3 file of the author reading the poems, or purchase (at cost-price) a print edition of the poem. You can also watch an awesome videopoem someone made based on the poems, read for the video project by someone else.

Poetry publishers take note. It doesn’t get better than this!

Other relevant multi-format publishing posts from the Very Like A Whale archive:

- multi-format poetry publishing!
Want poetry readers? publish in multiple formats, some free
Multi-format poetry publishing – production steps

multi-format poetry publishing!

I am beyond thrilled to see this great initiative from Dave Bonta. He has collected twelve very romantic poems into a chapbook called Twelve Simple Songs, and has made it available as:

- regular PDF download
an Issuu digital chapbook
an MP3 download
– and coming up: in print from a new POD service, Peecho

How awesome is that?! We, as potential readers, are asked ‘how do you like your poetry served?’ and we get some choices. I, for one, went for the regular PDF download, because honestly, I find Issuu aggravating to use. The chapbook looks really beautiful on my iPad in my iBooks reader, and is a breeze to read. Others will prefer the Issuu version, others the MP3 audio download, and others still, the upcoming print version. Some may want more than one version. By catering to all these different preferences, and by eschewing the profit motive (digital versions are free and the print version will be sold at cost), Dave has exponentially increased his poems’ chances of getting read.

A quick suggestion: Dave might at some point want to consider putting together a mini-website for Twelve Simple Songs, a place where he can consolidate the links to the different formats for future traffic and search engine huntings. As I mentioned in this 2011 post entitled another advantage of multi-format publishing, the beauty of a website for a chapbook or collection is that you can add things to the work as they happen – if someone writes a review, for example, or expands both the work’s content and its modes of expression by making a videopoem based on one or more of the poems.

Congratulations, Dave, on this tender collection and thanks for sharing it so generously.

Other relevant multi-format publishing posts from the Very Like A Whale archive:

- Want poetry readers? publish in multiple formats, some free
Multi-format poetry publishing – production steps